How Train Stations In Mumbai Were Named - Being Mumbai

How Train Stations In Mumbai Were Named

In the event that you’ve ever gone by a prepare in Mumbai, you’ve likely felt a mechanical monotone penetrate your awareness more than once – to such an extent that you’re acclimated to it saturate the foundation hustle, while you advance from one station to the next.

[highlight]”It’s not so much what you learn about Mumbai, it’s what you learn about yourself.” – Danny Boyle.[/highlight]

[highlight]”Next station, Bandra. Agla station, Bandra. Pudhil station, Bandre.”[/highlight]

You likely read it in the same mechanized voice as well.

Similar to all bustling dashing endlessly into our individual compartments, making a decent attempt not to get murdered, every one of a kind station name turns out to be only a last goal a pit stop. The names be that as it may, have more to them then their exaggerated nicknames. We present to you a rundown of the stations and a little story of how they got their names.

I. CHURCHGATE STATION

One of the busiest stations, “Churchgate” was named after the old Church Gate pulverized in the mid-1860′s. The entryway was one of the three fundamental doors to the Fort that permitted passage to St. Thomas’ Church. It was just consistent to embrace the name of this antique urban protest since it was implicit closeness to the position of the devastated external door. The old door remained as a passage to the congregation on the detect that Flora Fountain stands today. It shaped the limit of south Mumbai in the sixteenth hundreds of years.

The principal prepare at Churchgate station is planned at 4 am, and the last one leaves the station at 1 am.

 One of the busiest stations, “Churchgate” was named after the old Church Gate demolished in the mid-1860s. It stood as an entrance to the church on the spot that flora fountain stands today

One of the busiest stations, “Churchgate” was named after the old Church Gate annihilated in the mid-1860s. It remained as a passage to the congregation on the detect that vegetation wellspring stands today.

II. CHARNI ROAD

The principal hypothesis proposes a strict interpretation of “Charni” which implies touching. Previously, a few eating lands for steeds and steers were situated close to the station, which was apropos instilled into the name.

As indicated by another hypothesis, the name “Charni” or “Chendni” was conveyed to this region from Thane. An area close Thane Railway station is called “Chendni” and a large portion of its occupants settled in Girgaum thus renamed the settlement after their old home.

There are 2 theories about Charni's name. The first is from a literal translation of the word which means grazing and the second is that 'Charni' or 'Chendni' comes from a Thane locality by the same name wherein many of its inhabitants shifted to girgaum later.

There are 2 hypotheses about Charni’s name. The first is from an exacting interpretation of the word which implies brushing and the second is that “Charni” or “Chendni” originates from a Thane area by a similar name wherein huge numbers of its tenants moved to girgaum later.

III. MATUNGA

“Matunga” begins from the Marathi word, matang or elephant, attributable to the conviction that tuskers from Raja Bhimdev’s armed force were positioned in the range around the twelfth century. Amid the British Raj, Matunga served as an ordnance station yet was deserted by 1835 with the exception of two or three little villages lodging the relatives of previous menials at the military camp.

The word “Matunga” originates from the Marathi word, matang or elephant, owing to the belief that tuskers from Raja Bhimdev’s army were stationed in the area around the 12th century.

“Matunga” begins from the Marathi word, matang or elephant, attributable to the conviction that tuskers from Raja Bhimdev’s armed force were positioned in the range around the twelfth century.

IV. GOREGAON

While few trust that this station and suburb is named after the politically dynamic Gore (spelled Go-beam) family, who lived on the Western side of the suburb, others are of the supposition that the zone got its name gut gaon – the ‘white town’ since it was an expansive drain delivering focus since prior circumstances. Passing by the previous conviction, the name truly signifies ‘Gut’s town’ in Marathi. Goregaon got its Railway Station as ahead of schedule as 1862.

The area got its name gore-gaon – the “white village” since it was a large milk-producing centre since earlier times.

The territory got its name gut gaon – the “white town” since it was a huge drain delivering focus since prior circumstances.

V. NALASOPARA

Named after the site of the old port of “Shurparaka” or ‘Sopara’- one of the most seasoned port towns in India going back to over 1000 years, it is accepted to be Solomon’s Ophir by a few researchers, furthermore said to be Shurparaka, where the Pandavas rested amid their outcast specified in the epic Mahabharata.

Named after the site of the ancient port of “Shurparaka” or “Sopara”- one of the oldest port towns in India dating back to more than 1000 years, it is believed to be Solomon’s Ophir by some scholars

Named after the site of the old port of “Shurparaka” or “Sopara”- one of the most established port towns in India going back to over 1000 years, it is accepted to be Solomon’s Ophir by a few researchers

VI. SION

This station was inititally alluded to as “Shiv” in Marathi. In any case, the British had extraordinary trouble in claiming it effectively and renamed it as Sion.

The name “Sion” implies cleanliness. That loans its way to some incongruity given that the station is arranged near the world’s biggest ghetto Dharavi. It’s protected to state the significance of the name doesn’t make a difference any longer, at this point.

This station was inititally referred to as ‘Shiv’ in Marathi. However, the British had great difficulty in pronouncing it correctly and renamed it as Sion.The name “Sion” means cleanliness.

This station was inititally alluded to as “Shiv” in Marathi. Be that as it may, the British had extraordinary trouble in purporting it effectively and renamed it as Sion.The name “Sion” implies cleanliness.

VII. KANDIVALI

The Kandivali, or Khandolee station as it was once called, was opened in 1907. The name is potentially gotten from ‘Khand’, a sharp projection of shake, enlivened by the stone quarries arranged here.

The name is possibly derived from `Khand’, a sharp projection of rock, inspired by the stone quarries situated here.

The name is potentially gotten from `Khand’, a sharp projection of shake, enlivened by the stone quarries arranged here.

VIII. KURLA

One of the busiest stations on the focal line, “Kurla” began from ‘Kurli’, the nearby name for crab, (as these were found in bounty in swamps in the region) before it turned into a sub-urban territory.

 “Kurla” originated from “Kurli”, the local name for crab, (as these were found in plenty in marshes in the vicinity) before it became a suburban locality.

“Kurla” began from “Kurli”, the nearby name for crab, (as these were found in bounty in swamps in the region) before it turned into a rural territory.

 

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