10 reasons why Mumbai Local needs a big reform - Being Mumbai

10 reasons why Mumbai Local needs a big reform

Accident: An unfortunate incident that happens unexpectedly.
But what if the incident is expected? Will it still be an accident?

Everyday more than 75 lakh people travel by Mumbai local trains. It’s an overloaded network of trains that’s often called the lifeline of Mumbai. But for some people, this lifeline spells death.

According to an RTI report, over 3,304 people died on the tracks in 2015 alone and around 3,349 suffered accident injuries. That’s almost 9-10 people dying every single day! Even though this number is way higher than the cumulative deaths caused by terrorism in the last decade, we simply seem to ignore it because these deaths, over the years, have become something we already “expect” to happen. The city moves on day after day, going about its business, unmoved, unaffected and mostly unaware.

Over 4,500 passengers are packed into a 9-car rake during peak hours, as against the carrying capacity of 1,700 (on an average, eight people are forced to stand in less than one square meter area). Most of the fatalities are from lower middle-class families trying to get by in the city of dreams. The majority of the victims are between 21-40 years age group. Excessive overcrowding, uneven platforms, and local railway crossings are the root causes. Mumbai Suburban Railway System has around 89 Foot Over Bridges (FOB) and 7 Subways. Considering that Mumbai’s Railway Network has 136 Suburban stations (36 Western Railway, 62 Central Railway, 38 Harbour Line), it is clear that the number of FOBs is inadequate. The film features stories of victims like Samir Zaveri, who became a railway activist after losing both his legs in a fall from a Mumbai train two decades ago, and Roshan, who lost both her legs on 16 October 2008, after being pushed out of a crowded local train near Jogeshwari, and was found “unfit” to study medicine, which made Roshan fight her case in the high court and acquire first class in her final MBBS exams eight years later. We also feature families of victims who lost their lives and how adversely it affected them- emotionally as well as financially. People and authorities majorly answerable for such accidents- the railway system, the Government and the passengers themselves- all form a major part of the documentary. The film sincerely explores the steps that have been taken to reduce daily accidents and then goes on to talk about the right solutions we need to solve this issue. The views of daily passengers, entrepreneurs, social workers,

Mumbai Suburban Railway System has around 89 Foot Over Bridges (FOB) and 7 Subways. Considering that Mumbai’s Railway Network has 136 Suburban stations (36 Western Railway, 62 Central Railway, 38 Harbour Line), it is clear that the number of FOBs is inadequate. The film features stories of victims like Samir Zaveri, who became a railway activist after losing both his legs in a fall from a Mumbai train two decades ago, and Roshan, who lost both her legs on 16 October 2008, after being pushed out of a crowded local train near Jogeshwari, and was found “unfit” to study medicine, which made Roshan fight her case in the high court and acquire first class in her final MBBS exams eight years later. We also feature families of victims who lost their lives and how adversely it affected them- emotionally as well as financially. People and authorities majorly answerable for such accidents- the railway system, the Government and the passengers themselves- all form a major part of the documentary. The film sincerely explores the steps that have been taken to reduce daily accidents and then goes on to talk about the right solutions we need to solve this issue. The views of daily passengers, entrepreneurs, social workers, lawyers and doctors have been brought to light. We surely have a big problem and it cannot be solved in a day, but with consistent hard work and the right solutions, it is definitely possible to bring an end to it. Suggestions include: Increased Frequency of trains, better platforms, higher awareness, securing unmanned crossings, more footover bridges, better medical aid at stations and alternate modes of transport using the sea.

Source: Being Indian

 

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

arrow